From Zero to Adult: How to be taken seriously in life

5 things adults do that earns them respect:

Not that I’m an expert at 24. A friend, nearly twice my age once joked that she had shoes older than I am. So what could I possibly know about being a ‘grown-up’?

I’ve befriended people from all walks of life, and different ages. I’d never have guessed that I’d be mixing with 30 and 40-somethings one night and then be heading off to a 21st birthday the next. I’m lucky to know a diverse group of people; they teach me more than I would have learnt, had I only hung out with people of my age group.

I’ve met enough people to realize that age doesn’t come with maturity, you mature with age because of experiences and if you haven’t exposed yourself to the wonders of the world, you won’t be equipped to survive on your own. Some people in their 50’s are still finding their ‘path’, while others in their tweens are already hard pressed on pursuing their 5-year plans. The only way to be taken seriously in life is to develop some rituals:

Show up

When you’re an adult, you’re expected to stand by your commitments. Being flaky is the easiest way to be marked as unreliable. Those kinds of people aren’t ever taken seriously. If one day you weren’t in the mood to go to work, you call your boss with an excuse and he/she approves, they’re either letting your work load pile up or looking for a replacement because the show must go on. So unless you’re working on your own or for yourself, you are dispensable.

Own up

Everyone loves a person who can take responsibility for their own actions and improve upon it.

Love sparingly

Focus on what you love and you will live a prosperous lie. Don’t give much attention to negative things that are harmful to you. Gossiping and constant complaining for example, can really exhaust you – you also lose time to work on what’s actually bothering you. Mature adults discuss ideas, rather than people.

Hustle

The first time I heard the word hustle, I was listening to a rap song. I honestly thought that it was slang for “do what you need  to do” ( don’t ask me how old I was). Later, I saw a quote by Abraham Lincoln with the word hustle in it, and thought, “Woah! Lincoln was dope“. He said, “Things may come to those who wait, but only the things left by those who hustle.” Adults are way more competitive than kids on the playground, they just behave differently and don’t nag about it. If there are things that you want to do in your lifetime, do it, or someone else will beat you to it.

Speak up

On to the best part, you’re the boss of you. You choose your clothes, you buy your food, and you pay for your own petrol. Some people are naturally withdrawn and shy anyway from being heard by those around them, and by that I mean saying what they feel, agreeing, disagreeing, offering new ideas or simply making new friends. If you represent yourself with a confident voice, you’re literally branding yourself as someone who should be listened to, admired, or respected.

Do you have more more points  to add to the list? Follow me on Instagram and Facebook, or email me to robyn@bewhole.co.za. I’d love to hear from you.

 

Author: Robyn

  • I love this! Although I’m only 20, and still in school, I’m also married and don’t fit into the stereotype for my age. I am a big believer that maturity matters more than age (with marriage, kids, jobs, etc.).

    • Wow! Marissa. Thanks for sharing. Congratulations on your marriage and well done for continuing your studies. I’m not married but I can imagine that it must be quite difficult to manage a marriage, studies and everything else. You’re remarkable! Keep it up.

  • Love this post! Reminds me how grown up I thought I was back in my youth and how it took time and experience to really shape me as an adult. Like Marissa above, I was an early starter. I was in a committed relationship and had my son at 17, I had a mortgage at 18 and was running a successful business with my partner by then too. I learned to show up for myself, my family and my business and it helped make me the woman I am today. In contrast I still know people in their 40s, 50’s and beyond who have never grown up in the traditional sense – they have no responsibilities, they drift. Age isn’t always an accurate reflection of maturity.

    • You are the true inspiration Jane!

  • nice to meet you robyn… love your post… Being old and wise I have learned that it always good to be truthful about how you feel and say it in a nice way to others… no matter what. I’m going to enjoy your journey…

    • Lovely to meet you too Barbara! Please tell me you have an Instagram account. I would love to follow you.

  • Good post. I was just talking about this topic over the weekend. Many older people are very immature and have no idea what life is about or how to life it to the fullest, while many young people are engaging in life to the max.

    • That’s so true Brenda. I think it’s because younger people know more now due to access of information. They’re more equipped.